Noma disease

What is Noma?

What is Noma? How does it manifest itself? Who are the most affected populations? Discover all the information there is to know about one of the least known childhood diseases.

Symptoms of Noma

Knowing the first symptoms of Noma disease is a crucial step in the process of controlling Noma. What are these symptoms that only occur in younger children?

Noma in the world

Noma mainly affects the most vulnerable populations in the world, and the vast majority of them are children in Africa. Why are they concerned by Noma, and how how to overcome this situation?

What is Noma?

Noma, an unknown disease

Noma is a forgotten childhood disease of extreme poverty. This gangrene, which affects each year over 140,000 children aged from 2 to 6, infects their faces and leaves them completely disfigured. With a mortality rate of 90%, Noma mainly affects people in the world’s poorest areas, especially in South America, Southeast Asia and Africa.

By creating Noma Fund association, we are committed to reducing this disease in the perspective of its complete eradication. We have also launched the project “Acting against Noma 2021-2030”, which provides for the implementation of an action plan for the populations most likely to be affected by the disease, first in 10 target countries in Africa (Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Equatorial Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Senegal), then in all areas affected by the disease, including Africa, South America and South-East Asia. This plan, which integrates public authorities and all local actors (schools, health workers, associations, etc.), aims to improve knowledge, understanding and management of the disease, both before and after its appearance.

Symptoms of Noma disease

Noma disease: initial phase

Noma, a childhood disease that mainly affects the world’s poorest areas, presents several phases.

In the first phase of the disease, small lesions appear inside the mouth, quickly turning into facial edema. A fetid breath, some lymph nodes, high fever and diarrhea may also occur.

Informing and sensitizing populations about this first step in the infection process is a key focus in the fight against Noma disease. Indeed, at this stage, the infected child can be saved with a simple drug treatment.

The gangrenous phase of the disease

After the first phase of the disease, the evolution of Noma is dazzling. The infected area extends all around the mouth, until the face of the sick child is completely deformed. Gangrene is such that muscle tissues and bones are also infected.

This stage of the Noma infection process ends in 90% of cases with the death of the child, victim of necrosis. The survivors present mutilating forms of their faces, and are waiting in almost total isolation. Hidden under a veil or an unhealthy cloth, they are waiting for a providential hand that can support their surgical repair treatment in specialized hospitals in Europe (cf.video of Ita’s case).

Symptoms of Noma disease

Noma in the world

Africa, first concerned by Noma disease

Noma affects the world’s poorest populations. It is in conditions of extreme poverty, where malnutrition and lack of oral hygiene are rampant, that this childhood disease develops, affecting children between the ages of 2 and 6. Currently, the areas most affected by Noma disease are located in South America, Southeast Asia, and Africa.

It is in this latter area that Noma Fund’s action is primarily focused: by undertaking effective and targeted field actions throughout Africa as quickly as possible, Noma Fund members are committed to protecting children from all walks of life from this particularly devastating childhood disease, and enabling them too to live a happy and fulfilling life.

How to fight against Noma?

By raising awareness among local populations

Awareness-raising actions aimed at local populations is one of Noma Fund‘s primary objectives. Because it is by informing and sensitizing those who are most likely to be affected by Noma that we will be able to overcome the disease.

By facilitating access to healthcare

Today, survivors of Noma disease can only expect very expensive care, often provided in Europe. Noma Fund aims to facilitate access to healthcare by building care centres as well as a regional reference hospital in Africa.

Working with local actors

Informing about the first symptoms of the disease and providing first-aid training are our priorities! Also, Noma Fund works jointly with local actors, for a better handling of Noma patients and the achievement of our objectives.

Noma Fund France

10, avenue George V
75008 Paris
FRANCE


Tél : +33 1 88 61 80 60
Mail : contact@noma-fund.org

Noma Fund Belgium

56, rue des Colonies
1000 Brussells
BELGIUM

Tél : +32 2 808 87 28
Mail : contact@noma-fund.org

Noma Fund Belgique

56, rue des Colonies
1000 Brussells
BELGIUM

Tél : +32 2 808 87 28
Mail : contact@noma-fund.org